Last edited by Shabar
Tuesday, July 28, 2020 | History

8 edition of The vertebrate retina found in the catalog.

The vertebrate retina

principles of structure and function

by Robert W. Rodieck

  • 108 Want to read
  • 2 Currently reading

Published by Freeman in San Francisco .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Retina,
  • Vertebrates -- Anatomy,
  • Vertebrates -- Physiology,
  • Retina -- Anatomy and histology,
  • Retina -- Physiology,
  • Vertebrates

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: p. [984]-1036.

    Statement[by] R. W. Rodieck.
    SeriesSeries of books in biology
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQL949 .R62
    The Physical Object
    Paginationx, 1044 p.
    Number of Pages1044
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL4470288M
    ISBN 100716706962
    LC Control Number79190434

    Anatomical investigations of bipolar cells reveal a multiplicity ( depending on species) of different morphological types (), significantly more than the just two types that early physiology implied. The diversity of human retinal bipolar types is illustrated in Fig. 2. Nonetheless all of th . The vertebrate retina has a form that is closely and clearly linked to its func­ tion. Though its fundamental cellular architecture is conserved across verte­ brates, the retinas of individual species show variations that are also of clear and direct functional utility. Its accessibility.

    Free 2-day shipping. Buy Vertebrate Photoreceptors: Functional Molecular Bases (Hardcover) at Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. The retina is a thin layer of neural cells that lines the back of the eyeball of vertebrates and some cephalopods. It is comparable to the film in a camera. In vertebrate embryonic development, the retina and the optic nerve originate as outgrowths of the developing , the retina is part of the central nervous system (CNS).

    Read "Development of the Vertebrate Retina" by available from Rakuten Kobo. The vertebrate retina has a form that is closely and clearly linked to its func­ tion. Though its fundamental cellular a Price: $ Figure 1 Schematic outline of the basic tissular elements of vertebrate and invertebrate bicameral eyes. (A) The eye of vertebrates. The retina is inverted and the photoreceptors face the sclera. Transmission of the impulse with here cells (as in mammals), photoreceptor and ganglion, and transmission of the impulse with t two cells (as in fishes); (B) the bicameral eye of the octopus.


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The vertebrate retina by Robert W. Rodieck Download PDF EPUB FB2

The vertebrate retina has a form that is closely and clearly linked to its func­ tion. Though its fundamental cellular architecture is conserved across verte­ brates, the retinas of individual species show variations that are also of clear and direct functional utility.

Its accessibility, readily Cited by: The retina, like other parts of the CNS, derives embryologically from the neural tube. Retinal neurons and glia therefore have many properties in common with other CNS tissue, but they also exhibit specialized response properties and proteins that have evolved to serve the retina’s function in transducing light energy into nerve signals and analyzing the visual by: 1.

Development of the Vertebrate Retina (Perspectives in Vision Research) - Kindle edition by Barbara L. Finlay, Dale R. Sengelaub. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets.

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Development of the Vertebrate Retina (Perspectives in Vision Research). Book January In the vertebrate retina, this type of modular organization is of paramount importance for the proper functioning of the neural circuitry, and regular mosaics are found.

The physiology and morphology of the vertebrate retina - Robert F. Miller Section 2 Visual Psychophysics Color vision and night vision - Joel Pokorny and Vivianne C. Smith Visual acuity and contrast sensitivity - Gary S. Rubin Visual fields in retinal disease - Steven E. Feldon Section 3 Ocular Immunology Vertebrate color opponency begins in the outer retina where horizontal cells mediate inhibitory interactions between photoreceptors (Chapot et al.

b, Perlman et al. Cones inhibit each other via horizontal cells, which are large, highly interconnected neurons that communicate bidirectionally with photoreceptor synapses known as pedicles.

GABAc Receptors in the Vertebrate Retina by Haohua Qian S-Potentials and Horizontal Cells by Ido Perlman, Helga Kolb and Ralph Nelson Part VI: Retinal Neurogenesis: Early stages in the development of neurons and pathways. Book • 4th Edition • Edited by: Select Chapter 9 - The Physiology and Morphology of the Vertebrate Retina.

Book chapter Full text access. Chapter 9 - The Physiology and Morphology of the Vertebrate Retina. Robert F. Miller. Pages Section 2: Visual Psychophysics. The vertebrate retina has a form that is closely and clearly linked to its func­ tion.

Though its fundamental cellular architecture is conserved across verte­ brates, the retinas of individual species show variations that are also of clear and direct functional utility. Excellent recent reviews of glutamate's actions in the vertebrate retina have been published (Massey, ; Wilson, ; Massey and Maguire, ) and other surveys treating retinal electrophysiology or transmitter release (Matthews, ) have discussed retinal glutamatergic circuitry.

The literature on glutamate function, however, has. Organization of the vertebrate retina. Schematic diagram showing the different cell types (left) located in different retinal layers (right). The vertical transduction pathway through the retina. The moment light meets the retina, the process of sight begins.

About 60 years ago, scientists discovered that each vision cell’s receptive field is activated when light hits a tiny region in the center of the field and inhibited when light hits the area surrounding the center.

Jadhav AP, Roesch K, Cepko CL () Development and neurogenic potential of Muller glial cells in the vertebrate retina. Prog Retin Eye Res 28(4)– PubMedCentral PubMed.

The book consists of over illustrations with brief descriptions pointing out special features of each retina displayed. The detailed information on the complexity and variety of visual cells in different animals will give interested readers an insight on the retinae of vertebrates. The book is. Understanding the organization of the vertebrate retina has been the goal of many talented visual scientists during the past years.

With Cajal's () anatomic descriptions of the cell types that constitute the retina in a number of vertebrate species, and with an early understanding of the role of visual purple in photochemistry in combination with psychophysical studies of adaptation.

Understanding the organization of the vertebrate retina has been and still is the goal of many talented visual scientists over the years. Ramon y Cajal in the 19th century presented the first comprehensive anatomic descriptions of the neural cell types that constitute the retina in a number of vertebrate.

GABA C Responses on Retinal Neurons. The term "GABA C receptor" was first used by Johnston to describe a novel GABA binding site on neuronal membranes (1, 2).Although recent studies indicate a wide distribution of GABA C receptors in many parts of the central nervous system (), these receptors are most prominently expressed in the vertebrate the fish white perch retina, rod.

In the twenty-first century, we are just beginning to understand more clearly the enormous diversity and complexity of signaling processes in the retina. Integrating advances in the biochemistry, cell biology, physiology, and physics of phototransduction, Signal Transduction in the Retina presents the methodologies and experimental approache.

The retina is the innermost, light-sensitive layer of tissue of the eye of most vertebrates and some optics of the eye create a focused two-dimensional image of the visual world on the retina, which translates that image into electrical neural impulses to the brain to create visual retina serves a function analogous to that of the film or image sensor in a camera.

Although the avian retina has a duplex nature (i.e., containing both rods and cones) similar to that of primates, it also possesses (along with reptiles, many fish, and amphibians) photoreceptors known as double cones.

In fact, all vertebrate classes, with the notable exception of placental mammals, possess such double cones (Sillman, ). This is the first of three lectures on the vertebrate retina, its structure, function, and evolution. In this first part, we're going to look at photoreceptors and image processing.

Let's start with a look at the visual system in its entirety. The vertebrate retina first evolved some million years ago in ancestral marine chordates.

Since then, the eyes of different species have been tuned to best support their unique visuoecological.The mature vertebrate retina is a highly complicated array of several kinds of cells, capable of receiving light impulses, transforming them into neuronal membrane currents, and transmitting these in a meaningful way to central processing.

Before it starts to develop, it is a small sheet of.